• RE: Yahoo account hacker

    @Anjoe-maranan provide more info about the account, did you contact yahoo support team?

    posted in Ask a Hacker
  • RE: "freelancer.com" SCAM

    @AS87 i will try to contact them to fix this issue

    posted in Report a scam
  • RE: Hacker tools

    Nikto is a free software command-line vulnerability scanner that scans webservers for dangerous files/CGIs, outdated server software and other problems. It performs generic and server type specific checks. It also captures and prints any cookies received.

    posted in General Discussion
  • RE: Hacker tools posted in General Discussion
  • RE: Hacker tools

    said in Hacker tools:

    Metasploit penetration testing software Knowledge is power, especially when it’s shared. A collaboration between the open source community and Rapid7, Metasploit helps security teams do more than just verify vulnerabilities, manage security assessments, and improve security awareness; it empowers and arms defenders to always stay one step (or two) ahead of the game.Maltego is a network reconnaissance and data mining tool that gathers information from a large number of sources. Basically, it can mine data from various places on the internet, and will then gather that data and arrange it in an easy-to-read graph for you. ... In addition, Maltego may find out other connections to Mr.

    posted in General Discussion
  • RE: Hacker tools

    said in Hacker tools:

    John the Ripper is a fast password cracker, currently available for many flavors of Unix, macOS, Windows, DOS, BeOS, and OpenVMS. Historically, its primary purpose is to detect weak Unix passwords. These days, besides many Unix crypt(3) password hash types, supported in "-jumbo" versions are hundreds of additional hashes and ciphers.

    Follow us on Twitter
    John the Ripper is free and Open Source software, distributed primarily in source code form. If you would rather use a commercial product tailored for your specific operating system, please consider John the Ripper Pro, which is distributed primarily in the form of "native" packages for the target operating systems and in general is meant to be easier to install and use while delivering optimal performance.

    Proceed to John the Ripper Pro homepage for your OS:
    John the Ripper Pro for Linux
    John the Ripper Pro for Mac OS X
    On Windows, consider Hash Suite (developed by a contributor to John the Ripper)
    On Android, consider Hash Suite Droid
    Download the latest John the Ripper jumbo release (release notes) or development snapshot:

    1.9.0-jumbo-1 sources in tar.xz, 33 MB (signature) or tar.gz, 43 MB (signature)
    1.9.0-jumbo-1 64-bit Windows binaries in 7z, 22 MB (signature) or zip, 63 MB (signature)
    1.9.0-jumbo-1 32-bit Windows binaries in 7z, 21 MB (signature) or zip, 61 MB (signature)
    Development source code in GitHub repository (download as tar.gz or zip)
    Download the latest John the Ripper core release (release notes):

    1.9.0 core sources in tar.xz, 8.6 MB (signature) or tar.gz, 13 MB (signature)
    Development source code in CVS repository
    Get John the Ripper apparel at 0-Day Clothing and support the project

    To verify authenticity and integrity of your John the Ripper downloads, please use our GnuPG public key. Please refer to these pages on how to extract John the Ripper source code from the tar.gz and tar.xz archives and how to build (compile) John the Ripper core (for jumbo, please refer to instructions inside the archive). You may also consider the unofficial builds on the contributed resources list further down this page.
    These and older versions of John the Ripper, patches, unofficial builds, and many other related files are also available from the Openwall file archive.

    You may browse the documentation for John the Ripper core online, including a summary of changes between core versions. Also relevant is our presentation on the history of password security.

    There's a collection of wordlists for use with John the Ripper. It includes lists of common passwords, wordlists for 20+ human languages, and files with the common passwords and unique words for all the languages combined, also with mangling rules applied and any duplicates purged.

    yescrypt and crypt_blowfish are implementations of yescrypt, scrypt, and bcrypt - some of the strong password hashes also found in John the Ripper - released separately for defensive use in your software or on your servers.

    passwdqc is a proactive password/passphrase strength checking and policy enforcement toolset, which can prevent your users from choosing passwords that would be easily cracked with programs like John the Ripper.

    We may help you integrate modern password hashing with yescrypt or crypt_blowfish, and/or proactive password strength checking with passwdqc, into your OS installs, software, or online services. Please check out our services.

    There's a mailing list where you can share your experience with John the Ripper and ask questions. Please be sure to specify an informative message subject whenever you post to the list (that is, something better than "question" or "problem"). To subscribe, enter your e-mail address below or send an empty message to <john-users-subscribe at lists.openwall.com>. You will be required to confirm your subscription by "replying" to the automated confirmation request that will be sent to you. You will be able to unsubscribe at any time and we will not use your e-mail address for any other purpose or share it with a third party. However, if you post to the list, other subscribers and those viewing the archives may see your address(es) as specified on your message. The list archive is available locally and via MARC. Additionally, there's a list of selected most useful and currently relevant postings on the community wiki.

    Your e-mail address:

    Contributed resources for John the Ripper:

    Community wiki with custom builds, benchmarks, and more
    Custom builds for Windows (up to 1.8.0.13-jumbo)
    Custom builds for Mac OS X / macOS (up to 1.8.0.9-jumbo)
    Custom builds for Solaris (packages up to 1.7.6, non-packaged up to 1.7.8-jumbo-7)
    Custom builds for Android (up to 1.8.0)
    Ubuntu snap package (documentation, announcement)
    OpenVMS and SYSUAF.DAT support (signature) by Jean-loup Gailly
    OpenVMS executables for Alpha and VAX (signature)
    Local copies of the above files by Jean-loup Gailly and a much newer implementation by David Jones
    Local copies of these and many other related packages are also available from the Openwall file archive.

    John the Ripper is part of Owl, Debian GNU/Linux, Fedora Linux, Gentoo Linux, Mandriva Linux, SUSE Linux, and a number of other Linux distributions. It is in the ports/packages collections of FreeBSD, NetBSD, and OpenBSD.

    John the Ripper is a registered project with Open Hub and it is listed at SecTools.Aircrack-ng is a complete suite of tools to assess WiFi network security.

    It focuses on different areas of WiFi security:

    Monitoring: Packet capture and export of data to text files for further processing by third party tools
    Attacking: Replay attacks, deauthentication, fake access points and others via packet injection
    Testing: Checking WiFi cards and driver capabilities (capture and injection)
    Cracking: WEP and WPA PSK (WPA 1 and 2)
    All tools are command line which allows for heavy scripting. A lot of GUIs have taken advantage of this feature. It works primarily Linux but also Windows, OS X, FreeBSD, OpenBSD, NetBSD, as well as Solaris and even eComStation 2.

    Fresh news
    Aircrack-ng 1.6 25 Jan 20
    This release brings a ton of improvements. Along with bug fixes and improvements for a lot of tools, we have huge improvements under the hood thanks to code cleanup, deduplication, and reorganization of the source code. We also improved our buildbot, and addedd integration tests.

    The most notable changes are in Airodump-ng, it now sees WPA3 and OWE. Its rates now takes into account 802.11n/ac and aren't limited to 54Mbit anymore. It has PMKID detection, and some basic UTF-8 among other things.

    Many more details can be found in our blog post.

    Aircrack-ng 1.5.2 09 Dec 18
    Fourth and last release of the year. It is smaller than the previous one but we did want to release the fixes and improvements before the holidays so it will be available for Shmoocon next month in your favorite distro. Small issues were found in 1.5 and then in 1.5.1, which is why we ended up with 1.5.2.

    It brings fixes, a new feature and lots of improvements. More details in our blog post.

    More news...
    Under the spotlights
    Injection, -1 channel and other capture issues
    If you are having issues injecting or if you are receiving an error message talking about channel -1 or fixed channel in airodump-ng (top right of the screen) or aireplay-ng, kill the network managers using airmon-ng check kill before putting the wireless card in monitor mode.

    Airodump-ng scan visualizer
    Airodump-ng Scan Visualizer (by Pentester Academy) allows you to filter, sort and visualize Airodump-NG scan data. The tool currently uses the CSV file generated by Airodump-ng with the -w option and can work locally or as a hosted service.

    posted in General Discussion
  • RE: Hacker tools

    Wireshark is the world’s foremost and widely-used network protocol analyzer. It lets you see what’s happening on your network at a microscopic level and is the de facto (and often de jure) standard across many commercial and non-profit enterprises, government agencies, and educational institutions. Wireshark development thrives thanks to the volunteer contributions of networking experts around the globe and is the continuation of a project started by Gerald Combs in 1998.

    posted in General Discussion
  • RE: Hacker tools

    OWASP Top 10 for Application Security
    For the first time since 2013, the Open Web Application Security Project (OWASP) has updated its top 10 list of the most critical application security risks. What does this mean for you?

    posted in General Discussion
  • RE: Hacker tools

    THC Hydra logoWhen you need to brute force crack a remote authentication service, Hydra is often the tool of choice. It can perform rapid dictionary attacks against more than 50 protocols, including telnet, ftp, http, https, smb, several databases, and much more. Like THC Amap this release is from the fine folks at THC. Other online crackers are Medusa and Ncrack. The Nmap Security Scanner also contains many online brute force password cracking modules. For downloads and more information, visit the THC Hydra homepage.

    posted in General Discussion
  • RE: Hacker tools

    John the Ripper is a fast password cracker, currently available for many flavors of Unix, macOS, Windows, DOS, BeOS, and OpenVMS. Historically, its primary purpose is to detect weak Unix passwords. These days, besides many Unix crypt(3) password hash types, supported in "-jumbo" versions are hundreds of additional hashes and ciphers.

    Follow us on Twitter
    John the Ripper is free and Open Source software, distributed primarily in source code form. If you would rather use a commercial product tailored for your specific operating system, please consider John the Ripper Pro, which is distributed primarily in the form of "native" packages for the target operating systems and in general is meant to be easier to install and use while delivering optimal performance.

    Proceed to John the Ripper Pro homepage for your OS:
    John the Ripper Pro for Linux
    John the Ripper Pro for Mac OS X
    On Windows, consider Hash Suite (developed by a contributor to John the Ripper)
    On Android, consider Hash Suite Droid
    Download the latest John the Ripper jumbo release (release notes) or development snapshot:

    1.9.0-jumbo-1 sources in tar.xz, 33 MB (signature) or tar.gz, 43 MB (signature)
    1.9.0-jumbo-1 64-bit Windows binaries in 7z, 22 MB (signature) or zip, 63 MB (signature)
    1.9.0-jumbo-1 32-bit Windows binaries in 7z, 21 MB (signature) or zip, 61 MB (signature)
    Development source code in GitHub repository (download as tar.gz or zip)
    Download the latest John the Ripper core release (release notes):

    1.9.0 core sources in tar.xz, 8.6 MB (signature) or tar.gz, 13 MB (signature)
    Development source code in CVS repository
    Get John the Ripper apparel at 0-Day Clothing and support the project

    To verify authenticity and integrity of your John the Ripper downloads, please use our GnuPG public key. Please refer to these pages on how to extract John the Ripper source code from the tar.gz and tar.xz archives and how to build (compile) John the Ripper core (for jumbo, please refer to instructions inside the archive). You may also consider the unofficial builds on the contributed resources list further down this page.
    These and older versions of John the Ripper, patches, unofficial builds, and many other related files are also available from the Openwall file archive.

    You may browse the documentation for John the Ripper core online, including a summary of changes between core versions. Also relevant is our presentation on the history of password security.

    There's a collection of wordlists for use with John the Ripper. It includes lists of common passwords, wordlists for 20+ human languages, and files with the common passwords and unique words for all the languages combined, also with mangling rules applied and any duplicates purged.

    yescrypt and crypt_blowfish are implementations of yescrypt, scrypt, and bcrypt - some of the strong password hashes also found in John the Ripper - released separately for defensive use in your software or on your servers.

    passwdqc is a proactive password/passphrase strength checking and policy enforcement toolset, which can prevent your users from choosing passwords that would be easily cracked with programs like John the Ripper.

    We may help you integrate modern password hashing with yescrypt or crypt_blowfish, and/or proactive password strength checking with passwdqc, into your OS installs, software, or online services. Please check out our services.

    There's a mailing list where you can share your experience with John the Ripper and ask questions. Please be sure to specify an informative message subject whenever you post to the list (that is, something better than "question" or "problem"). To subscribe, enter your e-mail address below or send an empty message to <john-users-subscribe at lists.openwall.com>. You will be required to confirm your subscription by "replying" to the automated confirmation request that will be sent to you. You will be able to unsubscribe at any time and we will not use your e-mail address for any other purpose or share it with a third party. However, if you post to the list, other subscribers and those viewing the archives may see your address(es) as specified on your message. The list archive is available locally and via MARC. Additionally, there's a list of selected most useful and currently relevant postings on the community wiki.

    Your e-mail address:

    Contributed resources for John the Ripper:

    Community wiki with custom builds, benchmarks, and more
    Custom builds for Windows (up to 1.8.0.13-jumbo)
    Custom builds for Mac OS X / macOS (up to 1.8.0.9-jumbo)
    Custom builds for Solaris (packages up to 1.7.6, non-packaged up to 1.7.8-jumbo-7)
    Custom builds for Android (up to 1.8.0)
    Ubuntu snap package (documentation, announcement)
    OpenVMS and SYSUAF.DAT support (signature) by Jean-loup Gailly
    OpenVMS executables for Alpha and VAX (signature)
    Local copies of the above files by Jean-loup Gailly and a much newer implementation by David Jones
    Local copies of these and many other related packages are also available from the Openwall file archive.

    John the Ripper is part of Owl, Debian GNU/Linux, Fedora Linux, Gentoo Linux, Mandriva Linux, SUSE Linux, and a number of other Linux distributions. It is in the ports/packages collections of FreeBSD, NetBSD, and OpenBSD.

    John the Ripper is a registered project with Open Hub and it is listed at SecTools.

    posted in General Discussion